Branch Office Direct Printing

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Overview

Microsoft introduced Branch Office Direct Printing (BODP) for Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 desktops to support workstations printing directly to the destination printer or MFD, therefore bypassing the print server the queue was originally hosted on. The intention of this feature was to reduce the bandwidth consumption of print jobs being sent from branch offices to print servers in a main office.

PaperCut Direct Printing

PaperCut v16.0 introduces PaperCut Direct Printing, a solution which also has many of the same goals of Branch Office Direct Printing, but also includes many of the core services you come to expect from PaperCut, including the ability to track, control and audit usage of queues regardless of if they’re server based or direct, as well as Find Me Print, Secure Release of print jobs, charging to Shared Accounts and the like.

Customers considering a solution that allows for support of direct printing may like to consider PaperCut’s Direct Printing solution, especially if their goals are to also include the feature set of a cost recovery solution like PaperCut NG or MF.

A quick comparison

FeatureBODPPaperCut Direct Printing
Supported OS’Windows Server 2012, Windows 8 DesktopsAll supported PaperCut versions (Vista and above, OSX 10.8 and above)
Supports printing direct from desktop to printerYesYes
Reduces load on WAN linksYesYes
Supports the use of WSD portsYesNo
Retains audit/usage information on queuesNoYes
Supports USB or locally connected printersNoYes
Allows for Printer Pooling / Load BalancingNoYes

Categories: Implementation / Deployment, Architecture


Keywords: Direct Printing, Branch Office Direct Printing, BODP, direct printing

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Article last modified on February 26, 2016, at 04:52 AM
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