What Size Server Do I Need to Run PaperCut?

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How do I size my PaperCut system?

Before installing PaperCut customers often want to know what type of hardware they need to run a responsive system in their specific environments.

That’s quite a hard question to answer, but hopefully these guidelines will help you come up with an answer that makes sense for you.

Why doesn’t PaperCut just provide a simple formula based answer?

There are a large number of factors that affect the size of systems needed. For example:

  1. Number of average and peak users simultaneously using the system
  2. Type of jobs (size, printer language in use, printer filer options selected, possible printer scripting)
  3. Use and configuration of Find Me printing
  4. Use of other features such as Web Print, iOS Printing, Mobile Release, Print Archiving and so on.
  5. Network speeds and topology
  6. Use of embedded solutions on copiers if using PaperCut MF. Different copier platforms have different performance profiles
  7. Use of Payment Gateways and other external interfaces can also impact performance and are not under the control of the PaperCut application

With so many different factors interacting together, it is not realistic to provide a formula based approach as each site is unique. For these reasons we take a practical approach.

We do have a Sizing Guide that gives you an idea of Application Server sizing, but we do recommend testing in your environment for your particular organization size. Do not skimp on RAM. Allocate a server class amount of RAM to your VM.

NOTE: PaperCut uses 1/4 of the available memory of the machine by default. So if you are building a VM for the PaperCut App Server, start off with a 4GB VM, and allow PaperCut to use up to 1/2 of the memory by making this config change .

Below you’ll find a list of real-world configurations that are known to perform successfully in a production environment for extended periods of time. Pick a similar or large sized site to compare your hardware configuration for known good practice.


Education Organization 1

Organization Size

Licensed users
70,000 (estimated daily users 7,000)
Number of monitored printers
60
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
30

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type: VMWare
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 6Gb
8 x Print Servers
Type: Physical
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 2

Organization Size

Licensed users
60,000 (estimated daily users 4,500)
Number of monitored printers
150

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type: VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.58 GHz
Memory 4Gb
Print Server x 12
Type: Physical
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 3

Organization Size

Licensed users
70,000 (estimated daily users 3,800)
Number of monitored printers
800
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
250

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type: VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 6Gb
Print Server x 17
Type: Physical
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 4

Organization Size

Licensed users
50,000 (estimated daily users 30,000)
Number of monitored printers
80
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
98

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type: VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 4Gb
Print Server x 8
Type VMWare
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 5

Organization Size

Licensed users
300,000 (estimated daily users 100,000)
Number of monitored printers
170
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
25

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 4Gb
Print Server x 8
Physical
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 6

Organization Size

Licensed users
250,000 (estimated daily users 20,000)
Number of monitored printers
60
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
10

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 4Gb
Print Server x 6
VMWare
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Small/Medium Commercial Organization

Organization Size

Licensed users
500 (estimated daily users 500)
Number of monitored printers
15
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
150

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type VMWare
CPU 4 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 4Gb
Print Server x 2
VMWare
CPU 2 x 2.66 GHz
Memory 2Gb

Education Organization 7

Organization Size

Licensed users
50,000 (estimated daily users 30,000)
Number of MFDs running PaperCut embedded
10

Hardware Configuration

1 x Application Server
Type VMWare
CPU 1 x Quad core Xeon
Memory 16Gb
Print Server x 7
VMWare
CPU 1 x Dual core Xeon
Memory 8Gb

Examine the factors that are specifically relevant to you and then locate possible matches in our examples that will provide you with enough head room for future growth.

Notes

Consider database storage. This is the base data size plus number of print jobs per month (4.5Mb per 10,000 jobs). For example: allowing for 4 print jobs per user and a 30% increase that comes out at just under 1/2 Gb over three years. As our storage requirement is so low we do not suggest archiving. You can calculate your own value using the guidelines at

https://www.papercut.com/products/ng/manual/apdx-capacity-planning.html#cap-plan-db-sql-server.

Consider Print Server storage. Any print servers will require good disk I/O and disk space for print spooling (10+Gb depending on the number and size of the print jobs). The print server is responsible for print job analysis which is an intensive IO operation, modern enterprise class server disk IO support will be fine.

There is also additional information in our KB article https://www.papercut.com/kb/Main/CommonScalabilityQuestions


Categories: Implementation / Deployment


Keywords: server sizing, requirements, system requirements, resources, how big, specification, examples, configuration

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Article last modified on November 24, 2015, at 09:44 PM
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